PR leaders need frank feedback

Leaders need to be detached. Which means getting off the dance floor and going to the balcony.

There is a strong correlation between asking for feedback and the overall effectiveness of leaders. But  can you ask for feedback without risking your authority?

Sensitive to criticism?

At times I admit to having being sensitive when people  critiqued my PR efforts. You may have experienced something similar.  Invariably we try our best so when we do fall short, it can be uncomfortable when someone highlights our failures. Yet when people offer feedback it’s a terrific opportunity to improve performance.

PR managers may have substantial authority but they are only human.
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Delegate for happier PR

3Delegation builds better workplaces. Don’t believe me? Walk into a place where there’s frustrated staff, an uncertain atmosphere and low productivity and most likely you’ll find a boss making every decision, having all the ideas and insisting people work within strict limits.

Delegating is crucial for government, agency and not for profit PR leaders whether they manage small teams or large outfits.

Why delegate?

PR teams routinely juggle competing deadlines and multiple projects. That’s true for other disciplines but uncertainty and crisis are never far away from the PR professional. Plus there’s always a campaign in play, about to start or wrapping up.
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Take time to be a thought leader

ClockCWhen PR leaders start saying ‘we tried that and it didn’t work’  they become the barrier to innovation.

The longer you lead a communications team the danger grows that you default automatically to what’s worked in the past. Of course the past is where your successes lie but it becomes a problem when it stifles the creativity of your staff and fails you for the  future.

That’s why good PR leaders are always thought leaders with the habit of spotting the trends likely to impact their organisations, teams, even their own careers.

Leaders have little time so if you’re just surviving the working week how do you find space to think beyond your inbox?
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Thought leadership for PRs

Thought leaderA

Image: Rusty Crawshaw

A PR thought leader must be part explorer, advocate and activist – a curious mix that can be a terrific boost to your career.

One of the skills you – the leader – need is the ability to spot trends likely to affect your organisation and team. This applies to all leaders but specially to PR leaders.

Communications, communities and institutions are changing at lighting speed and unless we anticipate the future we can easily find ourselves marooned in present practice with outdated skills and talking to audiences that have long moved on.

Feeling the future

Thought leadership is about preparing your career, your team and your organisation for the future. 
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Why PR people should be great leaders

Communicator-Leader

Last week I asked 40 communicators to nominate a communicator-leader they admired. The room feel silent and only two people raised their hands. I was stunned. Surely there must be more because PR specialists  have leadership skills in profusion.

Recently I presented on the topic of leadership to Australian Government communicators in Canberra.  Which got me thinking how PR people in government and business rank when they get the chance to lead. Are PR professionals  superior, average or below par when it comes to leading teams and organisations?

Research

Research on the subject of PR leadership is thin.  There’s been some American research but scant Australian study.
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Bank PR may haunt Labor

Prime Minister Ben Chifley was responsible for the worst media release in Australian history.

In 1947 Australia’s banks launched a PR campaign against Prime Minister Ben Chifley.

This article first appeared in the Canberra Times, The Age and the Sydney Morning Herald.

You can almost hear the ghost of Prime Minister Ben Chifley applauding Bill Shorten’s calls for a Royal Commission into Australian banking.

Yet while Chifley might approve Shorten’s efforts he would probably think they do not go far enough. In 1947 Chifley, the train driver turned politician, led a Labor Government that legislated to nationalise Australia’s banks. In doing he triggered one of the largest public relations campaigns in Australian history, one that finally led to the defeat of his Government.
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Work the golden hour

ClockCPR leaders need time to think but it takes terrific self discipline to deliberately isolate your brain, silence your phone and unplug from the digital world.

Shortly I’ll be speaking at a Canberra conference on PR leadership and one  point I’ll be making is leaders are always busy because there is no such thing as a lazy leader.

Work rate

As the team leader you may not be the smartest person in your organisation. You may not be the best qualified.  You may not be the most skillful nor have the strongest influence. But you have one thing you control completely – your work ethic.
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Spot the difference between a PR leader and a PR manager

leadershipIn late April I’m speaking at a Canberra conference for Government communicators about what makes a good PR leader.  And how to develop the skills and characteristics you need to lead.

It’s a subject everyone in the room is sure to have an opinion on. By nature PR people are very perceptive continually assessing the people around us in senior positions.

While the academic and HR worlds abound with definitions, leadership is a word you normally don’t associate with the PR profession. I have always taken the approach that in the communications environment the difference is easy to spot.

A manager arranges.


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Fine line between PR and lobbying

LobbyistsEfforts in the US State of New York may limit the role of PR plays in grass roots campaigns.

Australian approach

Lobbying is a legitimate part of community communications but often it can look remarkably similar to what public relations professionals do.  Many large Australian PR agencies offer ‘government relations’ among their services.

The Australian Government Register of Lobbyists lists many of Australia’s largest PR firms as well as many smaller outfits.  From time to time the media scrutinises the actions of lobbyists in particular issues but the fact a (registered) PR professional can approach a government minister or senior bureaucrat on behalf of a client is unquestioned.
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Donald’s PR trumps politics

Trump #1Donald Trump is working a pretty sophisticated PR ploy with the fingerprints of reality TV all over it.

 

The American Establishment has been busy predicting Donald Trump’s demise since last June when he announced his run for the President of the United States.

Yet he has consistently led the national polls for the Republican Party nomination.

Trump was a reality TV star for 14 years and his show ‘The Apprentice’ made him an international celebrity. Now it seems he has migrated the essential ingredients of that genre into a campaign style that has delivered considerable success.

Trump is all about show.
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